Monthly Archives: November 2016

Free Spirit 10-Speed

My lastest bike repair project is a: Free Spirit 10-Speed
Not a lot of work was to be done, but mainly a good tune-up as well as some overhauls (wheel hubs, headset hub)

Specs:
Steel frame
Shimano Drive Train
5 (sprockets) x 2 (chainrings) speed
U-Brakes Dia compe
Turkey Levers

As usual, below are the photo comparison between “Before” (left) and “After” (right) the work/tune-ups

Grays/Torreys Peak (via Kelso Ridge)

Last weekend, considering that the snow appears to be late this year, I decided to go “bag” two 14ers (and as of today,  I have 51 to choose from !) as I am sure the snow will arrive soon and it will be too late to go up as high as 14,000 ft. It’s not that those peaks can’t be climbed with snow but more that our van can’t reach the snowy trailheads.

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Grays & Torreys Peak via the Kelso Ridge (GPS Track available here : 7.5 miles, +- 3,580 ft elevation gain/loss)

I chose Grays & Torreys Peak. I started running without being completely decided on if I would take the normal route or the alternative “Kelso Ridge” (while it sounded more fun, I was not sure about the snow/ice cover of the ridge). Arriving at the fork, it seemed that the ridge had snow on it but when I saw other hikers near the Knife-edge traverse, I decided to go for it!
Considered a class 3 scramble, I didn’t encounter any real difficulties until I reached the Knife-edge, 200m from the summit. There, the knife edge seemed too icy as well as its north face (I tried!)
Earlier, I had passed two hikers that caught up to me as I was trying to find a way to the summit. We discussed the different possibilities, I explained my attempt on the north face and we continued to look altogether for the best option. Roaming on the south side of the ridge, I lead to what seemed the only option to me: Go down a bit to arrive in a gully where we would climb up until reaching a pass at the base of the last part until the summit. While it seemed feasible to me, I would later learn that it is called the Dead dog couloir and is not recommended unless in winter full of snow.

My GPS track showing that I tried every side to avoid the icy knife-edge

A steep gully offering a mix of snow/ice/dirt, this couloir had a wall on its right side. With this wall,  I had envisioned to climb it by practicing the Dulfer technique. Up I went, while Chuck & Nik were watching me. After about 10min of hard work, I was at the pass and ready for the last slope to the summit !
Chuck & Nik did the same but I could feel their hesitation and was worried I was bringing them outside of their comfort zone.

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Chuck (in red circle) & Nik following me in the Dead Couloir
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The Dead Dog couloir from the base of Torreys Peak

On top of Torreys, we congratulated our selves (Chuck & Nik made it!) and I went on to Grays Peak for a second summit. A perfect day in the Rockies!!

Mt Audubon & Blue Lake

Last weekend, given that Hwy 34 has been closed since 2 weeks and will be closed until around June 2017, I have decided to go South to explore the Indian Peaks Wilderness (East of the Divide).

After looking at my maps, books and TODO list, I chose to summit Mt Audubon (13,229ft) and go to Blue Lake afterwards.

mtaudubon-bluelake

GPS Track available here (12.5 miles, +- 3,570 ft elevation gain/loss)

Arriving at the base of Mt Audubon, I was quickly welcomed by Pikas but also a strong & cold wind. At the top, the views were beautiful and I could see as far as Longs Peak.
I ended my run with Blue Lake, right below Mt Audubon

Pourquoi je cours – Why I run

But we don’t run for the baubles. We run long distances because in the deep dark recesses of our mind there still resides the instincts of our millions of years as running ape people. It’s in our biological heritage to run distances“.
Don Allison – A Step beyond: A Definitive Guide To Ultrarunning